Cleaning Sprays

With CoVid-19 still running rampant at the time of writing this post, many of our stores are running out of cleaning products, so thought it’s be a good time to remember some of the old DIY recipes so we can make some ourselves.

Spray cleaningVinegar cleaner

All-purpose and long-lasting, this removes grease and dirt. Ideal for stainless steel sinks, tiled and timber surfaces and plastic finishes such as fridge shelves and phones.

  • 2 cups white vinegar
    • 1 cup water
    • 25 drops eucalyptus oil

Combine all the ingredients in a spray bottle. Shake well before use, spray onto a soft damp cloth and rub. No need to rinse.

Lavender disinfectant

Keeps bathroom surfaces safe and smelling sweet. It also makes a marvellous spray when ironing bed linen.

  • 25 drops lavender essential oil
    • 2 tbsp methylated spirits or vodka
    • 500ml distilled water

Add the oil to the alcohol in a clean, dry bottle and leave to dissolve for 24 hours. Add water and decant into a spray bottle. Shake thoroughly before use.


Scouring paste

This is the simplest cleaner of all for sinks, oven doors, stovetops and inside mugs.

• 4 tbsp bicarb
• 1 tbsp water

Mix the ingredients into a stiff paste and apply with a damp sponge. Buff with a dry cloth.

Bicarb cleaner

A general cleaner, this is safe for use anywhere in the home.

  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
    • 1 tsp pure soap flakes
    • squeeze of lemon or dash of white vinegar
    • 1 cup warm water

Mix ingredients and shake until soap is dissolved. Spray and wipe with a sponge.

 

 

Poem of the Week 5April20

Encouragement

We all need a little bit of encouragement to help stay positive in our CoVid-19 world. Little things help others who live alone & can’t go out, a phone call, a message on Facebook or other social media, links to funny things a laughing raises our vibrations. I’m mainly just ringing my friends who are alone and they ring me too. I’ve also been lucky to receive an early Easter goodies gift dropped off by a lovely friend, no not Easter eggs, but healthy things, a couple of avocados, some delicious Frankfurt sausages & some biscuits. Very much appreciated.

Encouragement

Guide for Managing Aging Parent’s Finances

The Young Adult’s Guide to Managing an Aging Parent’s Money

Thanks to Brigid Ludwig for pointing me to a new guide on helping parents manage their money as they get older. It covers important discussion topics and warning signs that they may need help, as well as how to become their power of attorney and keep track of their important financial documents.

The guide also has advice on

Use this guide to organize you and your parents’ financial journeys and get ahead of any potential issues before they arise.

Marijuana Use Among Seniors Over 65 is Rising

Marijuana use is rising sharply among seniors over 65, study says, and there are serious risks

according to this CNN Study Report

The numbers of American seniors over age 65 who now smoke marijuana or use edibles increased two-fold between 2015 and 2018, according to research published Monday in JAMA.

California septuagenarian Carol Collin is one of them. About two years ago she began eating a marijuana “gummy” each night before bed to help with sleep.
“I am an absolute chronic insomniac. I have been ever since I was a little tiny child — it just drives me crazy,” Collin said. “I take this little cube and it just makes me drowsy so I can sleep and doesn’t leave me groggy in the morning.”
For pain relief, Collin uses a topical cream that contains both THC — the compound in the marijuana plant that makes you high — and CBD, the the compound in the plant used in medicinal marijuana. “I’m doing this to sleep and provide pain relief and I find it works”, she said. “I wouldn’t have done it if it was illegal.”
Dr. Benjamin Han, an assistant professor of geriatric medicine and palliative care at NYU Grossman School of Medicine said, “What I’m seeing in my clinic are a lot of older adults who are very curious about cannabis to treat this or that chronic disease and symptoms,”

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“I find it fascinating that people who would never touch an illegal drug are now trying to get it, even if it’s just for medical purposes,” said study co-author Joseph Palamar, an associate professor of population health at NYU Grossman School of Medicine.

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rolling-marijuana-cigaretteOver the last decade, Palamar and Han have published several papers estimating marijuana use by American seniors. To do so they analyze data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, a nationally representative survey of 15,000 people in the US who do not live in an institution, such as a nursing home.

“I was curious to see if it was people who are more sick, with say, multiple chronic conditions, trying cannabis, or is it the healthier people, perhaps with only one health condition,” Han said. “And it appears it’s the healthier older people who are trying cannabis more.”

Worrisome findings

“As a geriatrician, I worry about any kind of prescribed medicine or substance use — anything that has any kind of psychoactive effects,” Han said. “I worry about things like dizziness, falls. I worry how it may interact with certain medical conditions.”

An additional concern for many baby boomers who tried weed in the 1960s and ’70s, Palamar said, is the change in the nature of marijuana over the years.
“Weed has been getting stronger over the past few decades,” Palamar said, “and a lot of these seniors don’t take dosing seriously, especially edibles. They think ‘What’s the big deal? I used to do this when I was a kid.’

However, 74-year-old Carol Collin disagreed. “Eating or smoking too much pot isn’t a worry. Even when we were doing this years and years and years ago, I wasn’t much into eating brownies or the smoking kind of stuff ’cause I didn’t like losing my control of my life,” she said.

“And the people I know that are using marijuana today, they’re not drinking or smoking or anything. They’re using it for the pain relief because it works.”

Read the full article here:  CNN Study Report

Coronovirus, Coughs and Colds

With all the talk about the coronavirus, here is some information

woman-sneeze-into white-hankiefrom the World Health Organisation about this deadly virus, plus another link to a “Guide on Handling Coughs and Colds in the Elderly”, below.

Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans.

Coronaviruses are zoonotic, meaning they are transmitted between animals and people.  Detailed investigations found that SARS-CoV was transmitted from civet cats to humans and MERS-CoV from dromedary camels to humans. Several known coronaviruses are circulating in animals that have not yet infected humans.

Common signs of infection include respiratory symptoms, fever, cough, shortness of breath and breathing difficulties. In more severe cases, infection can cause pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure and even death.

Standard recommendations to prevent infection spread include regular hand washing, covering mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing, thoroughly cooking meat and eggs. Avoid close contact with anyone showing symptoms of respiratory illness such as coughing and sneezing.

https://www.who.int/health-topics/coronavirus

Helpful Guide on Handling Coughs and Colds in the Elderly

This helpful how-to guide tells you what you need to know about colds and flu, why elderly people are at a higher risk of infection, and how influenza and the common cold can lead to more serious health complications in older adults. Also, some useful tips and advice on preventive measures to help keep the elderly from catching colds and flu. You can find it here:

https://www.covonia.co.uk/coughs-colds-elderly-guide

Avoid Scams Targeting the Elderly

thiefScammers targetting the elderly & other vulnerable people are thieves ot the lowest order.

Calling it a scam doesn’t make it socially acceptable – it is still just plain THEFT!

Financial scams targeting seniors have become so prevalent that they’re now considered “the crime of the 21st century.” Why? Because seniors are thought to have a significant amount of money sitting in their accounts.

Financial scams also often go unreported or can be difficult to prosecute, so they’re considered a “low-risk” crime. However, they’re devastating to many older adults and can leave them in a very vulnerable position with little time to recoup their losses.

It’s not just wealthy seniors who are targeted. Low-income older adults are also at risk of financial abuse.

Sadly, it’s not always strangers who perpetrate these crimes. Over 90% of all reported elder abuse is committed by an older person’s own family members, most often their adult children, followed by grandchildren, nieces and nephews, and others.

Tim Henley, who works alongside Fiscal Tiger has sent this useful link with more information –  https://www.fiscaltiger.com/avoiding-elderly-scams/

Information on this link & other similar links, can be found on our resources for seniors sub-page at https://trishfindlay.com/resources-to-help-seniors/resource-links-day-to-day-living/

The Pleural Mesothelioma Center

Pleural Mesothelioma

Pleural mesothelioma is an asbestos-related cancer that forms in the lining around the lungs. It is the most common type of the disease, accounting for about 75 percent of mesothelioma cases. Treating pleural mesothelioma at an earlier stage improves prognosis.

Asbestos exposure is the main cause of pleural mesothelioma. The heavier the asbestos exposure and the longer a person is exposed throughout their lifetime, the higher the risk for mesothelioma.

Occupational Asbestos Exposure

Up until the 1980s, many workers sustained long-term, high-dose asbestos exposures in occupations at contaminated worksites such as refineries, construction sites and power plants. These types of longer-term asbestos exposure placed these employees at risk for developing pleural mesothelioma.

What Are the Symptoms of Pleural Mesothelioma?

Symptoms of pleural mesothelioma may be mistaken for less serious conditions. This makes them easy to ignore or misdiagnose. Early symptoms include wheezing, coughing, nonspecific chest pain and shortness of breath with physical exertion.

See this resource to help seniors suffering from mesothelioma and their caregivers find free care and support.. http://pleuralmesothelioma.com/cancer/prognosis/

Suburbia for the Homeless

Community First! Village

Mobile Loaves & Fishes, a nonprofit in Austin, Texas created a village of tiny homes and RVs to help permanently solve homelessness in Austin, Texas. But more than just providing homes, the group is fostering communities and providing job opportunities to the men and women who live there.

Community First! Village is a place that enables homeless men & women to heal. It’s a place where they can rediscover hope, renew their purpose and restore their dignity. Most importantly, it’s a place they can call home.

Phase I of the Village covers 27 acres and, once at full capacity, will be home to more than 200 formerly homeless men and women.

A suburbia for the homeless exists and they can live there forever

This nonprofit created a village of tiny homes and RVs to help permanently solve homelessness in Austin, Texas. But more than just providing homes, the group is fostering communities and providing job opportunities to the men and women who live there. https://cnn.it/2Ii6Tev

Posted by The Good Stuff on Friday, April 12, 2019

 

Read the full story here: https://mlf.org/community-first/

Activities For Seniors With Limited Mobility

Many older adults lose mobility due to conditions like stroke, severe arthritis, or injuries from falls. When that happens, activities and hobbies they used to enjoy might now be too difficult.

 

OlderYoungerWomenScrabble

 

But loss of mobility doesn’t mean the end of good times. There are many ways to have fun without needing to move around too much and this article has some very useful suggestions:

 

https://dailycaring.com/9-enjoyable-activities-for-seniors-with-limited-mobility/

DailyCaring

Seniors & Mental Health Issues

Getting older may be unsettling to some, what with greying hair, wrinkles and forgetting where you parked the car! But seriously, ageing can bring on a variety of health issues.

senior-suffering-from-depression

The World Health Organisation (WHO) reports that globally, the population is ageing rapidly and predicts that between 2015 and 2050, the proportion of people over 60 years will nearly double, from 12% to 22%.

Many seniors maintain good health and are fully able to function both physically and mentally well into their later years and they make important contributions to society as family members, volunteers and as active participants in the workforce. However, the biological effects of ageing will naturally lead to more physical and mental health problems among the older population than in younger age groups. They risk developing mental disorders, neurological disorders or substance use problems as well as other health conditions such as diabetes, hearing loss, and osteoarthritis. Furthermore, as people age, they are more likely to experience several conditions at the same time.

WHO figures show over 15 percent of adults over the age of 60 suffer from a mental disorder. The most common mental and neurological disorders in this age group are dementia and depression, which affect approximately 5% and 7% of the world’s older population, respectively. Anxiety disorders affect 3.8% of the older population, substance use problems affect almost 1% and around a quarter of deaths from self-harm are among people aged 60 or above.

Risk factors for mental health problems among older adults

reading-child-gran-wheelchair

Older people may experience life stressors common to all people, but also stressors that are more common in later life, like a significant ongoing loss in capacities and a decline in functional ability. For example, older adults may experience reduced mobility, chronic pain, frailty or other health problems, for which they require some form of long-term care. In addition, older people are more likely to experience events such as bereavement, or a drop in socioeconomic status with retirement. All of these stressors can result in isolation, loneliness or psychological distress in older people, for which they may require long-term care.

Mental health has an impact on physical health and vice versa. For example, older adults with physical health conditions such as heart disease have higher rates of depression than those who are healthy. Additionally, untreated depression in an older person with heart disease can negatively affect its outcome.

Older adults are also vulnerable to elder abuse – including physical, verbal, psychological, financial and sexual abuse; abandonment; neglect; and serious losses of dignity and respect. Current evidence suggests that 1 in 6 older people experience elder abuse. Elder abuse can lead not only to physical injuries, but also to serious, sometimes long-lasting psychological consequences, including depression and anxiety.

Cognitive Health

depressed-worried-man

Cognitive health is focused on a person’s ability to think, learn and remember. Independence in later life is as much determined by cognitive ability as by physical ability. Among older adults a broad spectrum of cognitive capability exists with dementia at one extreme and normal cognitive function at the other. Adequate cognitive functioning is required
to perform simple activities of daily living such as dressing and bathing and more complex tasks such as managing money, paying bills and taking medications.

The most common cognitive health issue facing the elderly is dementia, the loss of those cognitive functions. Approximately 47.5 million people worldwide have dementia—a number that is predicted to nearly triple in size by 2050. The most common form of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease with as many as five million people over the age of 65 suffering from the disease in the United States alone. According to the National Institute on Aging, other chronic health conditions and diseases increase the risk of developing dementia, such as substance abuse, diabetes, hypertension, depression, HIV and smoking. While there are no cures for dementia, physicians can prescribe a treatment plan and medications to manage the disease.

Mental & Emotional Health

senior-man-sitting-on-bed-at-home

Depression is believed to occur in 7% of the elderly population, but unfortunately, it is often under-diagnosed and under-treated. Older adults account for over 18 percent of suicides deaths in the United States. Because depression can be a side effect of chronic health conditions, managing those conditions help.

People in the following categories generally showed a higher rate of depression & anxiety:

  • A strong association has been found between loss of vision and depression, with less consistent or weaker relationships between hearing loss and depression
  • Physical inactivity
  • Disturbed sleep
  • Taking five or more drugs daily, including prescribed, over-the-counter, and complementary medicines

Preventative Measures

The WHO guidelines urge health providers and societies to be prepared to meet the specific needs of older populations with training, prevention & management of age-associated chronic diseases, designing suitable policies on long-term & palliative care and developing age-friendly services & settings.

Additionally, promoting a lifestyle of healthy living such as betterment of living conditions, programs to prevent & deal with elder abuse and social support from family, friends and support groups in the community.

active-retired-seniors-two-old-men-playing-chess