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The choice of computer mouse is a very individual thing and depends on many factors:

  • How many hours a day you work at your computer?
  • Is your primary computer a desktop, a laptop or notebook or even a tablet; but you won’t be needing a mouse if it is a tablet, will you?
  • How big your hands are.
  • Do you want/need to use wired, wireless or bluetooth?
  • Whether you use the scroll function or not.
  • Do you suffer from wrist pain?

In some of these instances, the cheaper type mouse that comes with your computer will serve your needs adequately, but if you, like me work for about eight hours every day, the comfort and functions of your mouse are particularly important.
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On the left below is a photo of the first mouse I paid in excess of $60 for and never regretted it at all. It was comfortable in my largish hands and I didn’t ever suffer any wrist pain even though I worked at my PC sometimes up to 12 hours in a day. The day I dropped it on the tiled floor and broke it was a very sad day for me.
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Luckily I was able to buy another different model  but with the same profile within a couple of days. That one too has died lately so I’m looking for a new one, the Kensington mouse on the right below might well be the one since I have had a word in Santa’s ear!
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The logitech 2nd from left has served as my laptop mouse for a couple of years – it does look a bit battered, doesn’t it? Very similar profile and quite comfortable. The third photo shows my big hands – imagine my right hand wrapped around one of these tiny mobile models! However, I do carry a retractable one around in my laptop bag, as a backup and the occasions when an extra mouse is needed to test someone’s computer.

 History of the computer mouse

Tracking Technology

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Did you know that the name mouse is derived from “Manually Operated User Select Equipment”? This makes the argument about whether more than one computer mouse should be called computer mouses or computer mice (as we do for the rodent variety). It seems there has been no absolute ruling and generally computer companies avoid the issue by calling them mouse devices. Probably mouses is technically correct, but it sounds awkward and people tend to use mice for the plural form.
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The original design for a mouse was mechanical; the mouse had a ball in a compartment underneath and embedded around the edge were some little rollers. These would clog up from the dust and dirt from the user’s desk and needed cleaning to keep the mouse running smoothly (I did this countless times when clients or friends complained that their mouse wasn’t working properly). There were also four sliding type feet that clogged up as well, but these devices were a boon when the alternative was just keyboard shortcuts.
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Along came optical technology and made our lives so much easier. A small LED on the bottom of the mouse translates the movement of your hand into movement of the mouse pointer. Laser mouse devices work the same way, but using a laser instead af the LED. Laser mice have a higher dpi (dots per inch) which means they are more sensitive. For general users this extra sensitivity is not really needed, but graphic designers and gamers often appreciate the difference and make a laser mouse their choice.

Wired Connectors

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The early mice (see above) had a serial connector plug, see picture below. Serial ports were the original standard for interfacing any device with any other device on a computer. Later, a smaller 6 pin Mini Din was introduced by IBM on their PS/2 personal computer and this led to the connector type being called PS/2. For many years PC’s had PS/2 connectors for both keyboard and mouse.
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Some computers still come with two PS/2 ports, but more commonly they just have one, the USB (Universal Serial Bus) being the most common type of interface on all computers, whether PC or Mac. All USB ports look the same, but there is the original USB 1.1 and USB 2.0 which allows much faster (almost 40x as fast) or increased delivery capabilities. The ports are backwards compatible, so you can plug an old USB 1.1 device into a 2.2 port and it will still go.

Wireless

Originally the mouse device was connected to the computer by a cable using one of the technologies above, but nowadays you have the choice (an increasingly common one), to go with wireless. The early hassles of wireless connections seem to have been ironed out and wireless usually works very easily on any platform. Yay! So much more freedom.

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Radio Frequency – this is the most common type of wireless interface. A generic mouse operates on th 27MHz frequency and the mouse is powered by batteries. More expensive models can come with rechargeable batteries or charging docks for the mouse. They may use higher frequencies and have a longer range.
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bluetooth.
Bluetooth was useful for lower speed devices like a mouse and was common on early laptops. They are also battery powered and use the 2.4GHz radio frequency to communicate with a receiver/charger supplied with the package or some other Bluetooth adapter...
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RFIDRFID (Rapid Frequency Identification) technology uses radio-frequency electromagnetic fields to transfer data to automatically identify and track tags, which for a mouse is movement. Developed by a company called A4Tech, the mouse must be used in conjunction with the included mose pad, but the advantage is that it is wireless and no batteries are needed.
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Wheels and Buttons

Nearly all mouse devices nowadays have three buttons, with the middle button also being a scroll-wheel. This scroll wheel is essential in my opinion to navigate up and down your screen and on web pages. Any other buttons, typically on the left hand side for a right handed mouse or on the RHS for a left handed mouse, can be programmed by the user to carry out different functions.

 

Buying a computer mouse

A quick search on eBay will show just what a variety of choice there for buying a new mouse – some are fun, some are fancy, some for serious gamers and some ergonomic models for users like me. So how do you choose?

Narrow down the options with these requirements:

  • Do you want wired or wireless?
  • Do you need laser or will Optical suit your needs?
  • What size – full-sized, medium or small (also called compact,  mini, mobile, laptop etc)
  • PS/2 or USB? USB is more common but if your computer does not have many USB ports, but does have PS/2 ports, using a PS/2 mouse (or keyboard) will leave an extra USB port available for other peripherals.
  • Scrolling – do you need left and right as well as up and down?
  • Buttons – does your work (or play) require advanced features?

A great place to see what is available is on eBay, even when you want to shop locally. The wide variety of mouse devices listed there will give you a good idea of all the functions and help you narrow down your choice.
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I have a mouse collection on eBay, just for the fun of it – see some of my pics

See my Collection here http://www.ebay.com/cln/plfbus/Fun-Fancy-Mouse-Collection/66866785015

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Joint Venture Agreement

Joint Venture

Internet marketers often work alone to generate income for themselves, but sometimes it can be mutually beneficial to form a joint venture with other like-minded folks working on similiar projects.

The ability to spread out effort and risk, while increasing returns, can be somewhat risky, but one worth taking because, if the exercise is successful, you have made a new friend and maybe even developed a permanent working relationship.

As with any worthwhile pursuit there are some core basics and guiding principles that joint venture participants should practice when seeking partners and executing a plan.

Before proceeding, it’s essential to know what a joint venture is. A “JV” is an agreement between two parties each seeking to cooperatively leverage the assets of each other, be it a skill, a product, a trade secret, or a customer or prospect list. In the case of an internet marketer, the agreement usually involves one marketer mailing to the other’s mailing list.

Once it’s been determined that a joint venture will be undertaken there are some fundamentals that should be followed to assure the best outcome.

Assessing your partner is a critical first step when forming a joint venture. Analyzing each other’s strengths and weaknesses and discerning each other’s agenda beforehand will serve to lessen negative surprises later.

You can get a free Joint Venture Agreement form here.

Strategy development is an initial activity where both participants assess the viability of their effort and any potential obstacles to the outcomes they plan to achieve. Concurrently, the partners can set milestones and financial agreements during this period. A 50-50 profit split is most common. In some cases, a newer marketer may forego some of the proceeds in order to establish a presence in their market.

Once these tasks are found to be suitably addressed, the new associates can move on to carrying out the campaign. Of course, this is not a static operation. If time and duration allows, testing and improvement should be ongoing as the campaign proceeds to its conclusion.

Finally, the hopefully happy and prosperous end is reached and various goals realized. It’s important to note that any end-defining milestones should have been during the assessment and strategy sessions. This will prevent misunderstandings and promote further collaboration.

Another pointer is to aim high. Sure, rejection may be the first response, but perseverance rules the day and a big player could be the tipping point to reaching a critical mass of success and security.

Lastly, always operate with a win-win mentality while following the sequence. Do it right, and it will be the first of many join ventures…or the last one you’ll ever need.

For more information, you can get a free copy of “Joint Ventures: Tips for Successful Partnerships” from this link or by clicking on the book below.

Joint Ventures

Last Friday I heard about the World Internet Summit, which was being held in Melbourne for the three days, Sep 11th to 13th & I suddenly decided I would attend. I believe this is one of the best decisions I have ever made as the event can only be described as an internet marketers’ dream.

        Some of the speakers in Melbourne

There were no less than eleven internationally acclaimed and very, very successful internet entrepreneurs talking to us, all willingly sharing some of their best techniques and giving us tantalizing insights into what we could learn if we could become a student or protégé.

                    More of the speakers at the internet summit

It was a great opportunity to meet with other like minded folk, to discuss all the different areas of internet marketing that we have chosen and also to get new ideas, as these were generously exchanged.

                Some of the attendees and speakers

That’s me in the bottom left hand corner with Steven Essa. The fellow in the centre is Brett McFall, who along with Tom Hua, puts on this event several times every year in different countries. I was able to get a few words with Brett on the last day. (Click on the speaker icon if you can’t hear the audio).

Best wishes
Trish

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