Afformations – Ask the Right Questions

Can asking a question help to solve your problems?

AFFORMATIONS® isn’t just another book on getting what you want. It’s a proven step-by-step guidebook to living the life of your dreams.

INSIDE THIS BOOK, YOU’LL DISCOVER . . .

•4 simple steps to reach your goals faster than you ever thought possible (page 35)
•How an unhappy employee went from chronic debt to a six-figure income using this method (page 94) •The 5-word phrase that will attract your desires on complete autopilot (page 53)
•The 10 words that will help you lose 10 pounds—and keep it off! (page 88)
•How to think like a millionaire in less than 5 minutes a day (page 197)AND THAT’S JUST THE BEGINNING . . .

 

Afformations

Afformations®: The Miracle of Positive Self-Talk

Suburbia for the Homeless

Community First! Village

Mobile Loaves & Fishes, a nonprofit in Austin, Texas created a village of tiny homes and RVs to help permanently solve homelessness in Austin, Texas. But more than just providing homes, the group is fostering communities and providing job opportunities to the men and women who live there.

Community First! Village is a place that enables homeless men & women to heal. It’s a place where they can rediscover hope, renew their purpose and restore their dignity. Most importantly, it’s a place they can call home.

Phase I of the Village covers 27 acres and, once at full capacity, will be home to more than 200 formerly homeless men and women.

A suburbia for the homeless exists and they can live there forever

This nonprofit created a village of tiny homes and RVs to help permanently solve homelessness in Austin, Texas. But more than just providing homes, the group is fostering communities and providing job opportunities to the men and women who live there. https://cnn.it/2Ii6Tev

Posted by The Good Stuff on Friday, April 12, 2019

 

Read the full story here: https://mlf.org/community-first/

Activities For Seniors With Limited Mobility

Many older adults lose mobility due to conditions like stroke, severe arthritis, or injuries from falls. When that happens, activities and hobbies they used to enjoy might now be too difficult.

 

OlderYoungerWomenScrabble

 

But loss of mobility doesn’t mean the end of good times. There are many ways to have fun without needing to move around too much and this article has some very useful suggestions:

 

https://dailycaring.com/9-enjoyable-activities-for-seniors-with-limited-mobility/

DailyCaring

Seniors & Mental Health Issues

Getting older may be unsettling to some, what with greying hair, wrinkles and forgetting where you parked the car! But seriously, ageing can bring on a variety of health issues.

senior-suffering-from-depression

The World Health Organisation (WHO) reports that globally, the population is ageing rapidly and predicts that between 2015 and 2050, the proportion of people over 60 years will nearly double, from 12% to 22%.

Many seniors maintain good health and are fully able to function both physically and mentally well into their later years and they make important contributions to society as family members, volunteers and as active participants in the workforce. However, the biological effects of ageing will naturally lead to more physical and mental health problems among the older population than in younger age groups. They risk developing mental disorders, neurological disorders or substance use problems as well as other health conditions such as diabetes, hearing loss, and osteoarthritis. Furthermore, as people age, they are more likely to experience several conditions at the same time.

WHO figures show over 15 percent of adults over the age of 60 suffer from a mental disorder. The most common mental and neurological disorders in this age group are dementia and depression, which affect approximately 5% and 7% of the world’s older population, respectively. Anxiety disorders affect 3.8% of the older population, substance use problems affect almost 1% and around a quarter of deaths from self-harm are among people aged 60 or above.

Risk factors for mental health problems among older adults

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Older people may experience life stressors common to all people, but also stressors that are more common in later life, like a significant ongoing loss in capacities and a decline in functional ability. For example, older adults may experience reduced mobility, chronic pain, frailty or other health problems, for which they require some form of long-term care. In addition, older people are more likely to experience events such as bereavement, or a drop in socioeconomic status with retirement. All of these stressors can result in isolation, loneliness or psychological distress in older people, for which they may require long-term care.

Mental health has an impact on physical health and vice versa. For example, older adults with physical health conditions such as heart disease have higher rates of depression than those who are healthy. Additionally, untreated depression in an older person with heart disease can negatively affect its outcome.

Older adults are also vulnerable to elder abuse – including physical, verbal, psychological, financial and sexual abuse; abandonment; neglect; and serious losses of dignity and respect. Current evidence suggests that 1 in 6 older people experience elder abuse. Elder abuse can lead not only to physical injuries, but also to serious, sometimes long-lasting psychological consequences, including depression and anxiety.

Cognitive Health

depressed-worried-man

Cognitive health is focused on a person’s ability to think, learn and remember. Independence in later life is as much determined by cognitive ability as by physical ability. Among older adults a broad spectrum of cognitive capability exists with dementia at one extreme and normal cognitive function at the other. Adequate cognitive functioning is required
to perform simple activities of daily living such as dressing and bathing and more complex tasks such as managing money, paying bills and taking medications.

The most common cognitive health issue facing the elderly is dementia, the loss of those cognitive functions. Approximately 47.5 million people worldwide have dementia—a number that is predicted to nearly triple in size by 2050. The most common form of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease with as many as five million people over the age of 65 suffering from the disease in the United States alone. According to the National Institute on Aging, other chronic health conditions and diseases increase the risk of developing dementia, such as substance abuse, diabetes, hypertension, depression, HIV and smoking. While there are no cures for dementia, physicians can prescribe a treatment plan and medications to manage the disease.

Mental & Emotional Health

senior-man-sitting-on-bed-at-home

Depression is believed to occur in 7% of the elderly population, but unfortunately, it is often under-diagnosed and under-treated. Older adults account for over 18 percent of suicides deaths in the United States. Because depression can be a side effect of chronic health conditions, managing those conditions help.

People in the following categories generally showed a higher rate of depression & anxiety:

  • A strong association has been found between loss of vision and depression, with less consistent or weaker relationships between hearing loss and depression
  • Physical inactivity
  • Disturbed sleep
  • Taking five or more drugs daily, including prescribed, over-the-counter, and complementary medicines

Preventative Measures

The WHO guidelines urge health providers and societies to be prepared to meet the specific needs of older populations with training, prevention & management of age-associated chronic diseases, designing suitable policies on long-term & palliative care and developing age-friendly services & settings.

Additionally, promoting a lifestyle of healthy living such as betterment of living conditions, programs to prevent & deal with elder abuse and social support from family, friends and support groups in the community.

active-retired-seniors-two-old-men-playing-chess

 

 

Paying for Alzheimer’s Care

5 Ways to Pay for Alzheimer’s Care

DementiaPhotoStevenHWG

Every 65 seconds a senior is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease— that means more than 5 million Americans over the age of 65 live with this devastating disease. These seniors, and their families, are managing care for a chronic condition that can be moderate or severe, and progresses over time. That’s why there is such a high emotional cost with Alzheimer’s — and a high financial cost, too. In fact, the Alzheimer’s Association reports that for all people diagnosed in the U.S., the disease costs an estimated $277 billion a year. More than $60 billion of that comes directly out of the pockets of patients.

Many individuals pay an annual average of $56,800 for the treatment and care associated with Alzheimer’s. Medicare or private insurance covers about 40 percent of those costs, which leaves people struggling to cover the remaining 60 percent. If you or someone you love has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, things might seem frightening or hopeless, wondering how you’ll deal with the cost of care. It’s important you talk to your family, insurance plan and healthcare provider, but, in the meantime, here are a few ideas about ways you can cover that 60 percent without sacrificing the quality of your care.

  • Medicare Advantage Plans: If you are relying solely on traditional Medicare to help with Alzheimer’s costs, you might be footing the bill for a lot of services. For instance, there are gaps in coverage when it comes to prescription drugs, in-home care and rehabilitative services. Be clear on what your plan does and does not cover so you can look into supplemental plans that offer more assistance.
  • Tap into Your Equity: After a lifetime of living and working, you have assets you can dip into to help cover the cost of unexpected expenses that can pop up with Alzheimer’s care. For example, you can sell a life insurance policy, cash out a 401k or take out a reverse mortgage on your home. We’ve all heard horror stories associated with reverse mortgages, which is why it’s critical you do thorough research to find trustworthy and reputable reverse mortgage lenders that can assist you with the process.
  • End-of-Life Insurance Options: It’s not uncommon for bills and debt to pile up while managing Alzheimer’s care; something you don’t want to leave behind for your family to deal with. You can purchase additional insurance to help protect their financial future. For instance, burial insurance can not only cover the cost of funeral arrangements, but many options even cover other outstanding debt.
  • Government Assistance: In most cases, Alzheimer’s disease qualifies as a disability, which means you may qualify for government assistance programs like Supplemental Security Income or, for those under 65, Social Security Disability Income. Many states also offer caregiver support programs to help offset the costs of hiring in-home help.
  • Clinical Trials: Participating in a clinical trial is a personal decision that not everyone is ready to make. Since Alzheimer’s is a degenerative cognitive disorder, a person in a more severe version of the disease may not be ethically able to clearly make a decision. However, for those that can, and do, clinical trials can provide people with low or no cost access to leading healthcare facilities. Plus you’ll be contributing to the future of Alzheimer’s care. There are a lot of risks and side effects to consider, so be sure to weigh your options.

Right now, you might be feeling overwhelmed and alone. Navigating the complex world of planning and paying for Alzheimer’s care can be hard, but it is not impossible. Whether trying to find coverage for yourself or a family member, there are options out there that can make good care much more accessible.

Best Home Improvement Loans 2019

Does your home need maintenance or improvements?

For homeowners in the US, Andy Kearns (LendEDU) has sent me the following link with an outline the best personal loan options for home improvements, plus information on each lender such as their rates, loan amounts, and eligibility requirements.

 https://lendedu.com/blog/best-home-improvement-loans

Most homeowners have to-do lists full of home improvement projects which can get quite expensive. For this reason, they wanted to create an article educating them on the costs involved, ways to finance the project, and when it’s a good idea to work on home improvements.

Do You Have Shiny New Object Syndrome?

First posted on Medium at https://medium.com/@trish_39797/do-you-have-shiny-new-object-syndrome-b783c38281f8

Shiny-objects

I’ve just finished reading Shaunta Grimes medium post titled “Three Ways to Combat Shiny New Things Syndrome – Because You Actually Do Need to Finish What You Start”.

This really gels with me because I, too am a good starter of new things but not a very good finisher and can sometimes get stuck early in Act II, which is pretty pathetic when you think about it. The only positive I can console myself with is that I find new ideas that have huge potential easily & often, I just need to learn how to pick one, set a goal for that one and stick with it till I reach that goal. Perhaps then that “thing” can become part-time or secondary while I explore a new shiny object. Rinse & repeat, as they say.

And even though Shaunta is a writer and her shiny new things were probably new subjects to write about, her strategies apply equally to anybody whose shining new things could be jobs or hobbies, sports or self-development courses, anything at all that they like to do or learn about. For me it’s usually some new software for graphics & animation or some new plan for making money.

The Cost of Shiny New Things/Objects Syndrome

Chasing shiny new things can be expensive for three reasons. Firstly, because if you only just start out all the time and never finish, you never get to the stage of getting any return on your investment, only the expenses.

The second cost is time and I believe it is an even higher cost than wasting money by not finishing things. You can always get more money somehow, but no-one can buy time. 24 hours a day for however long we live is what we all get equally and it’s all we can ever have. Lost time cannot ever be replaced & that makes time the most precious resource any of us have in life.

The third cost is lack of self-worth. You look on yourself as a failure and let’s be honest, you are a failure with regard to not reaching your goals, but it tends to take over your thoughts about yourself and you can start to think of yourself as a failure overall, just like a boy whose autocratic father, on receiving his son’s report card with 3 A’s & 2 B’s but one D in the father’s field of expertise, then calling his son a dunce and a failure.

Looking Back

Photo by Riccardo Mion on Unsplash

Having reached my 70’s, I look back and can say that I’ve had a very interesting life with highlights like offshore sailing, flying a light plane for several years, jumping out of one at 10,000 feet, with a parachute of course since I’m alive and writing this!

But what I haven’t got is financial security in my senior years for various reasons, some not under my direct control, but nevertheless, the decisions I’ve made in the past have created the situation I’m now in.

Looking back, it’s easy to see where I didn’t spend money wisely, didn’t finish some of the training paid for and started but not finished; wasted time learning things that would have more efficiently been outsourced to someone already experienced in that field (but it was interesting learning these new things!).

Being Disciplined

Being brutally honest with myself, I lacked self-discipline for many of my years and still do to a lesser extent. The strategies I use now are a lot like those in Shaunta’s article and I list them here as it may be a useful guide to others in their quest to defeat the “Shiny”syndrome.

1. Expectations?—?set some for each day. Whatever your current project is, make a commitment to move forward in some measurable way. I like to write down a list either at night or first thing in the morning of what I want to achieve each day. My daily commitments go on that list as well as meetings & reminders so I don’t forget them.

2. Start each day with a positive mindset and when I say start, I mean before you get out of bed make a conscious decision to have a good day. Perhaps you don’t believe it, but your attitude to everything that happens to you is your choice. Things that happen are often not your choice, but how you think about them is. Waking up and saying to yourself “It’s Monday. I hate my work” is not going to result in the happiest or most productive day.

Shaunta says not to let your inner critic take over. For me this means that if I start feeling like I’m a failure, I take my mind on a brief journey remembering my successes and things I’m good at. We’re all good at something, so find yours. They don’t need to be huge, even something simple like being friendly and making people smile can have a more positive effect than you’ll ever know.

3. Be accountable to someone.

You’ll probably hate this idea; I always resisted and have only recently agreed to do this with someone I know well, but I believe it will help me to stop getting side-tracked by some of my interests. We can still have interests, so long as we keep doing our current project for the committed time each day.

4. Write down the Shiny New Things that come to you.

Even though you’re not going to follow them immediately, keep a record of your ideas because you might need them later, or some of them anyway. Knowing you have them stored safely for the future lets you free your mind to focus on your current project.

I’m not saying I’ve totally overcome my desire to keep trying new things straight away, because I haven’t, but I’m better at focusing on the task at hand now and since time is running out, it’s really now or never for me.

Sleep and Aging: Guide for Seniors

Understand common sleep problems seniors face and how to treat them

sleep and aging

There’s a common misconception that your sleep matters less as you age, but in fact, the inverse is true. No matter where you lie on the age spectrum you should be conscious of improving your sleeping habits for your holistic health.

For older adults, this is especially true. Your sleeping habits will naturally change as you age, so it’s important that you remain aware of those shifts and understand the best ways to protect your sleep quality.

Seniors may experience changes in becoming more sleepy during the day, being ready for bed earlier in the evenings, waking up earlier, or having trouble achieving deep sleep. Although these changes can be normal, suffering from disturbed sleeping patterns or other symptoms of insomnia are issues that should not be dismissed as a side effect of aging.

Read the full article here: https://www.mattressadvisor.com/sleep-and-aging/

The Value of a Smile

Smiling is awesome.

CuteSmilingGirlIt can make us feel better, happier and more positive almost instantaneously. When we’re feeling down, even a forced smile in the mirror can lift our mood and help us feel more optimistic about life, even when we face challenges.

Most of us will smile when we make eye contact with someone smiling and know that if we smile at someone, even a stranger, very often they will smile back.

Why is that?

Charles Darwin, in his 1872 publication “The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals” was one of the first to propose that “the free expression by outward signs of an emotion intensifies it.”

From research since that time, we have the facial feedback hypothesis which states that “facial movement can influence experience”. In other words, our facial expressions contribute to how we feel.

Zygomaticus_major_muscle

When we smile and flex the zygomatic major muscle (the one that raises the corners of the mouth when a person smiles) our brain thinks, “I must be happy.”

So, if your mood is neutral or worse, the facial feedback hypothesis says it will improve by simply smiling.

People who smile appear more likeable according to researchers at the Face Research Laboratory at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland in 2011. Subjects were asked to rate smiling and attractiveness and both men and women were more attracted to images of people who made eye contact and smiled than those who did not.

 

Smilers tend to be more productive at work and make more money (for example, waitresses know they’ll receive better tips when they smile at their customers or even draw smiley faces on the bill!) Black-Smiley

Other Benefits of Smiling

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Smiling releases the feel-good neurotransmitters, dopamine, endorphins and serotonin  that provide numerous health benefits, including:

  • Reduced blood pressure
  • Increased endurance
  • Reduced pain
  • Reduced stress
  • Strengthened immune system

In a tense setting, smiling not only decreases your stress levels, it makes you more relaxed, allowing you to better collect your thoughts and make more informed decisions.It can also make you seem more trustworthy and competent and because smiling is contagious, when you smile others will likely smile too, making them more relaxed as well.

So smile more often, at yourself and at others. You can never know what is happening in other people’s lives, but some people feel very lonely and isolated so just smiling can make a huge difference in their day.

Be aware, however, that not everyone is capable of responding. Studies have shown that facial feedback appears to be processed differently by individuals in the autism spectrum. Anyone suffering facial paralysis does not have the ability to smile and unfortunately statistics show that these people suffer more from depression than the general populations.

So if you smile at someone and they don’t respond, don’t make judgements or be discouraged, keep smiling as you will always benefit yourself.

No smile is ever wasted.

Rabbit Smiling